Honors Biology

       

Honors Biology

 Differentiated Lesson Plan

Subject: Honors Biology                      Grade: 9            Time Frame: Sep 5-  Oct 13, 2017  Nine Weeks Exam Oct 13 on Unit 1 & 2

UNIT 2:  Ecology 
Chapter 3:  The Biosphere
Chapter 4:  Ecosystems and Communities
Chapter 5:  Populations
Chapter 6:  Humans in the Biosphere

Unit#:  2                     Unit Title:  ECOLOGY

Chapter 3:  The Biosphere

Pacing:   Sep 5-15

H.W Packet given every Mon due Thurs.

Essential Questions

1.  Identify biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem.

2.  Describe how a change in one factor in an ecosystem can affect others.

3.  Describe the roles of producers and consumers in ecosystems.

4.  Describe the structure of a food chain.

5.  Explain how food chains and trophic levels are related.

6.  Analyze feeding relationships in a food web.

7.  Summarize Earth’s hydrologic and carbon cycles.

8.  Trace the flow of energy through an ecosystem, using an energy pyramid.

9.  Relate energy pyramids to food chains and trophic levels.

Teacher Notes:

 

Introduction to ecology

 

SC.912.L.17.10: diagram and explain the biogeochemical cycles of an ecosystem, including water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles.

 

Concepts

Benchmarks: Objectives and Skills

www.floridastandards.org

 

Differentiated Instruction:  Recommended Activities and Labs. (See BEEP for additional instructional strategies)

Benchmark Clarifications (BC) (Learning Goals)

Content Limits (CL)

PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY

 

 

Chapter 13 –

 

 

2.  Biotic and abiotic factors

3.  Energy in ecosystems

4.  Food chains and food webs

5.  Hydrologic Cycle

6. Biogeochemical Cycles

7.  Pyramid models

SC.912.L.17.5

analyze how population size is determined by births, deaths, immigration, emigration, and limiting factors (biotic and abiotic) that determine carrying capacity.

 

SC.912.L.17.9

use a food web to identify and distinguish producers, consumers, and decomposers, and explain the transfer of energy through trophic levels.

explain the pathway of energy transfer through trophic levels and the reduction of available energy at successive trophic levels.

 

SC.912.E.7.1

Analyze the movement of matter and energy through the different biogeochemical cycles, including water and carbon.

 

Go to www.classzone.com, choose chapter 13 from pull-down menu; select WebQuest: Keystone Species

 

Go to www.classzone.com , choose chapter 13 from pull-down menu; select animated biology, choose simulation Build a Food Web

BC(17.5)- 1. Students will use data and information about population dynamics, abiotic factors, and/or biotic factors to explain and/or analyze a change in carrying capacity and its effect on population size in an ecosystem.

2. Students will identify positive and/or negative consequences that result from a reduction in biodiversity.

3. Students will assess the reliability of sources of

information according to scientific standards.

CL- 1. Items referring to reduction in biodiversity may include examples of catastrophic events, climate changes, human activities, and the introduction of invasive and nonnative species, but they will not assess specific knowledge of these.

2. Items referring to reduction in biodiversity will focus on the consequence and not require knowledge of the specific event that led to the reduction.

BC (17.9) 1. Students will describe the energy pathways through the different trophic levels of a food web or energy pyramid.

2. Students will analyze the movement of matter through different biogeochemical cycles.

CL-  1. Items referring to organisms in food webs are limited to the impact of changes in matter or energy in trophic levels.

2. Items addressing food webs will require application of the knowledge of roles of organisms in a food web to describe energy pathways rather than the identification of producers, consumers (primary, secondary, tertiary), and decomposers.

3. Items will not require knowledge of specific organisms or their feeding habits.

4. Items assessing biogeochemical cycles are limited to the water cycle and the carbon cycle.

5. Items referring to the biogeochemical cycles may address but will not assess photosynthesis and cellular respiration in isolation.

 

Unit#:   2                     Unit Title:  ECOLOGY

Chapter 4:  Ecosystems and Communities

Pacing:   Sep 18-25

Test Sep 25

H.W Packet given every Mon due Thurs.

Essential Questions

1.  Describe the interactions of biotic and abiotic factors in the biosphere.

2.  Identify factors that determine Earth’s climate zones.

3.  Describe biotic and abiotic features of Earth’s six major biomes.

4.  Identify the four major ocean zones and organisms unique to each zone.

 

 

Concepts

Benchmarks: Objectives and Skills

www.floridastandards.org

 

Differentiated Instruction:  Recommended Activities and Labs.

 

Ecosystems and Communities

1.  Life in the Earth system

2.  Climate

3.  Biomes

4.  Marine Ecosystems

SC.912.L.17.5

analyze how population size is determined by births, deaths, immigration, emigration, and limiting factors (biotic and abiotic) that determine carrying capacity.

 

SC.912.L.17.4

describe changes in ecosystems resulting from seasonal variations, climate change and succession.

 

SC.912.L.17.2

explain the general distribution of life in aquatic systems as a function of chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and temperature.

 

Go to www.classzone.com  choose chapter 15 from pull-down menu; select animated biology, choose simulation Where Do They Live?

1. Students will explain that different types of organisms exist within aquatic systems due to chemistry, geography, light, depth, salinity, and/or temperature.

2. Students will describe the potential changes to an ecosystem resulting from seasonal variations, climate changes, and/or succession.

3. Students will identify positive and/or negative consequences that result from a reduction in biodiversity.

4. Students will assess the reliability of sources of information according to scientific standards.

1.  Items referring to chemical factors in aquatic systems are limited to pH, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, phosphorous, and salinity.

2.  Items referring to geography in aquatic systems are limited to water depth, latitude, temperature, underwater topography, and proximity to land.

3.  Items will not require the identification of oceanic zones.

4.  Items referring to reduction in biodiversity may include examples of catastrophic events, climate changes, human activities, and the introduction of invasive and nonnative species, but they will not assess specific knowledge of these.

5.  Items referring to reduction in biodiversity will focus on the consequence and not require knowledge of the specific event that led to the reduction.

6.  Items addressing climate change are limited to biodiversity and population dynamics contexts.

                  

 

Unit#:   2                     Unit Title:  ECOLOGY

Chapter 5:  Populations

Pacing:  Sep 26 –Oct 4

H.W Packet given every Mon due Thurs.

Essential Questions

1.  Describe three basic types of survivorship curves in relation to reproductive strategies.

2.  Describe four factors that affect population size.

3.  Compare exponential and logistic population growth.

4.  Identify factors that limit population growth.

5.  Explain the difference between primary and secondary succession.


 

 

Concepts

Chapter 5:  Populations

 


INTERACTIONS IN ECOSYSTEMS

 

Chapter 14 –

3.  Population density and distribution

4.  Population growth patterns

5.  Ecological succession

 

SC.912.L.17.5

analyze how population size is determined by births, deaths, immigration, emigration, and limiting factors (biotic and abiotic) that determine carrying capacity.

 

SC.912.L.17.4

describe changes in ecosystems resulting from seasonal variations, climate change and succession.

 

Go to www.classzone.com choose chapter 14 from pull-down menu; select WebQuest: Environmental Stress

 

Go to www.classzone.com   choose chapter 14 from pull-down menu; select animated biology, choose simulation What Limits Population Growth

1. Students will describe the potential changes to an ecosystem resulting from seasonal variations, climate changes, and/or succession.

2. Students will identify positive and/or negative consequences that result from a reduction in biodiversity.

3. Students will assess the reliability of sources of information according to scientific standards.

. Items referring to reduction in biodiversity may include examples of catastrophic events, climate changes, human activities, and the introduction of invasive and nonnative species, but they will not assess specific knowledge of these.

2. Items referring to reduction in biodiversity will focus on the consequence and not require knowledge of the specific event that led to the reduction.

 

 

Unit#:   2                     Unit Title:  ECOLOGY

Chapter 6:  Humans in the Biosphere

 H.W Packet given every Mon due Thurs.

Essential Questions

1.  Summarize the current state and effects of human population growth.

2.  Explain the importance of effective resource management.

3.  Describe the sources, types, and effects of air pollution.

4.  Explain how air pollution contributes to acid rain.

5.  Describe how water pollution affects ecosystems.

6.  Explain how biomagnification causes accumulation of toxins in food chains.

7.  Assess the consequences of loss of biodiversity.

8.  Explain how loss of habitat and introduced species affect ecosystems and biodiversity,

9.  Define sustainable development and describe some of its methods.

10.  Explain how protecting an umbrella species can protect an entire ecosystem.

Teacher Notes:

 

REVIEW TOPICS FOR Nine Weeks

Nine Weeks Exam Oct 13 on Unit 1 & 2

 

Concepts


HUMAN IMPACT ON ECOSYSTEMS

1. Human population growth and natural resources

2.  Air Quality

3.  Water Quality

4.  Threats to Biodiversity

5.  Conservation

SC.912.L.17.20

predict the impact of individuals on environmental systems and examine how human lifestyles affect sustainability.

SC.912.L.17.11

evaluate the costs and benefits of renewable and nonrenewable resources, such as water, energy, fossil fuels, wildlife, and forests.

SC.912.L.17.8

recognize the consequences of the losses of biodiversity due to catastrophic events, climate changes, human activity, and the introduction of invasive, nonnative species.

SC.912.L.17.13

discuss the need for adequate monitoring of environmental parameters when making policy decisions.

 

Lab: Acid Rain – page 493

 

Quick Lab: Modeling Biomagnification – page 496

 

Go to www.classzone.com choose chapter 16 from pull-down menu; select WebQuest: Invasive Species

 

Go to www.classzone.com , choose chapter 16 from pull-down menu; select animated biology, choose simulation Human Effects on a Food Web

1.Students will predict how the actions of humans may impact environmental systems and/or affect sustainability.

2. Students will evaluate possible environmental impacts resulting from the use of renewable and/or nonrenewable resources.

3. Students will identify ways in which a scientific claim is evaluated (e.g., through scientific argumentation, critical and logical thinking, and/or consideration of alternative explanations).

Items referring to renewable and nonrenewable resources will focus on the environmental costs and benefits of using those resources and not on identifying examples of renewable and nonrenewable resources.

Items will not require knowledge of specific environmental regulations, pollution prevention technologies or devices, or other mechanisms used to prevent pollution.

Items assessing a scientific claim are limited to impacts on the environment and renewable and nonrenewable resources.